Throughout May, the forget-me-nots in the garden have formed a beautiful blue haze over the flowerbeds. As they say, all good things must come to an end, however, and now they are fading it’s time to pull them out to make room for the other plants vying for space in the sun. I suppose they’re called forget-me-nots because, despite the ferocity with which we’re pulling out bucket load after bucket load of the things, they’re sure to be back next year! We’re never going to forget a plant which, whatever we do, keeps on returning. Not that we’re concerned with this: they bring a subtle, gentle colour to the garden, forming a misty background against which other plants shoot forth their green spring growth. As any gardener knows, not only are they lovely from a distance, the closer you get the lovelier they appear. Clusters of blooms form a natural bouquet atop each stem, lush dark green leaves contrasting with the gentle blue. And then closer still: each of the myriad of flowers is perfect. Five small petals, arranged with perfect symmetry around a five-pointed white star crowned with a tiny, intricately detailed yellow or white centre. Why such intricacy? Why such beauty? The flower’s function is simply to attract pollinating insects – so why such delicate glory? And why is there so much difference? The forget-me-nots are giving way to geraniums; the daffodils have ceded their position to the lupins; the foxgloves will soon take over from the aquilegia. If all of these have the same function – merely to attract the bees – why does nature create such variety? Perhaps there is something else we are not-to-forget: “O Lord, what a variety of things you have made! In wisdom you have made them all.” (Psalm 104:24-25 NLT). The intricacy, the beauty, the variety suggests a creator. The meticulous design of each tiny flower implies a designer. Perhaps, when we look at the natural world, it is not just a tiny flower that has a message for us. “When you look at my creation,” says the Lord God, “forget me not.” pershore.bible pershore-christadelphians.org

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